Showing posts with label SONY. Show all posts
Showing posts with label SONY. Show all posts

28 March 2021

SONY UX-S (1993) - Red Guide Block


SONY UX-S (1993)
Red Guide Block
More vintage audio: https://www.1001hifi.com/

18 September 2020

SONY Walkman (1989) - The Making of

walkman

In 1979 a burst of inspiration brought together two seemingly unrelated projects which were under way at SONY: incredibly light-weight headphones and a compact stereo tape player. The transistor radio offered a means to take broadcast music out of the home, to anywhere you wanted to be. The Walkman took the world a giant leap further by allowing individuals to "program" their own music and listen to it anytime, anywhere. Recording your favourite selection of songs onto a Compact Cassette(*) was the "program" used in a Walkman.

This short photo story focuses on the making of the 10th Anniversary Walkman, the SONY WM-701C. This factory tour was presented in a SONY document from 1989 dedicated to the 10th Anniversary of the SONY Walkman.

(*) The Compact Cassette was invented by PHILIPS in 1963.


SONY factory Japan
walkman

SONY robots on production line
walkman

walkman

First test
walkman

Pick-and-place machine for SMD components
walkman

Two identical circuit boards are ready
walkman

... more work at SONY
walkman

Final tests
walkman

Special packaging of the SONY WM-701C "10th Anniversary"
walkman

Ready for delivery
walkman



14 March 2020

SONY TA-N77ES (1988) - Digital to Analog

amplifier

Introduced in 1988 the SONY TA-N77ES was the only power amplifier ever from SONY to support large VU meters as a visual element. ​Power amplifiers are usually tested when hooked up to 8-ohm laboratory resistors. While results may look fine on a spec sheet, they simply ignore an undeniable fact. Real loudspeakers - even those nominally rated at 8 ohms - simply refuse to behave like laboratory resistors. While the resistor presents a simple impedance that's constant at all audio frequencies, the speaker presents a complex impedance that varies dramatically. A typical "8-ohm" loudspeaker can have impedance peaks higher than 30 ohms and impedance dips lower than 3 ohms! And here's the catch: as impedance drops, more and more current is demanded from the amplifier. 

Thanks to large power transformers, generous power supplies, big output transistors and massive heat sinks, the SONY TA-N77ES produce this current in casual disregard of loads. In preference to inexpensive integrated circuit "power packs" SONY ES insists on individual (discrete) output transistors. Sony's carefully-selected discrete transistors cost more, but their enhanced cooling, proven reliability and superior frequency response make them more than worth the cost. To reduce resonance and vibration Sony used a G-Base made of calcium carbonate reinforced with glass fibers, a unique compound similar in composition to marble. To accompany the SONY TA-N77ES power amplifier there were two remote controlled preamplifiers, the SONY TA-E77ES and the TA-E77ESD with added Digital inputs. Technical data: 200 W/ch 20-20,000 Hz 8 ohm THD 0.004% Dimensions: 470 W x 185 H x 440 D mm, Weight: 25 kg.


amplifier

amplifier

amplifier

amplifier

26 October 2019

SONY TC-177SD (1973) - First 3 Head Cassette Deck

cassette deck

The SONY TC-177SD (TC-6150SD in Japan) was introduced in 1973 and it was the first 3 head cassette deck from Sony and probably a world first too. Assuring extraordinary sound quality are a ferrite erase head and Ferrite & Ferrite Record and Playback heads. F&F heads give excellent tape-to-head contact and wide frequency response, in addition to lasting up to 200 times longer than the standard permalloy variety. Adding to the excellent performance characteristics is the Closed-Loop Dual Capstan Tape Drive, which severely cuts down tape skewing, modulation distortion and wow and flutter. Being a product of the 70's the deck also had "surround compatibility" Through Symphase Recording, you can record 4-channel sound from an SQ or FM matrix source, and play it back through four speakers and an amplifier equipped with a 4-channel decoder. And the solenoid assited transport functions provide stable, fast and easy mode changes. Separate bias and tape select switches let you take the advantage of normal, chrome or ferri-chrome tapes. During its production years there were available two versions. The initial models had no azimuth control but later in production this was also added. With only one large motor the rewind and fast forward time was 90sec./C-60. Frequency response is 20 Hz to 20 kHz with both FeCr and CrO2 tapes. 


cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck


cassette deck





04 July 2019

40th Anniversary - The Walkman

Walkman

The world first Walkman was introduced on 1st of July 1979. This was the SONY TPS-L2 and was created by the co-founders of SONY, Akio Morita and Masaru Ibuka, with Kozo Ohsone. This was not the first SONY handheld cassette machine but it was the first playback only, dedicated compact cassette music player. (previous models were recorders made for reporters) Even though introduced in 1979 it was only by 1980 that the name Walkman (in Janglish) was first used. Initially the SONY TPS-L2 was sold as "Soundabout" in the US, "Stowaway" in the United Kingdom, and "Freestyle" in Australia. The term "Walkman" eventually made its way into the Oxford English Dictionary in 1986. During it's history a series of "specialized" models were introduced like Sports or high-tech models, slightly thicker then the cassette itself.


Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman
The First Walkman Advert

22 May 2019

SONY TC-R7-2 (1977) - Two Track Magic

reel to reel

Sony's hi-fi components line has to be heard to be believed. With the lowest wow and flutter of any deck Sony ever built, a duo of tape recorders were introduced in 1977. These were the Japanese market SONY TC-R6 and SONY TC-R7-2. The same models were available worldwide as SONY TC-765 and SONY TC-766-2. They both share the same construction but while the R6 is a 4 Track Stereo Recorder running at 9.5 and 19 cm/s the R7-2 is a 2 Track Stereo Recorder running at 19 and 38 cm/s with an additional 4 Track head for playback. The SONY TC-R7-2 achieves an incredible wow and flutter of 0.018% (WRMS) at 38 cm/s and 0.04% (WRMS) at 19 cm/s. This is achieved via a Closed Loop Dual Capstan Tape Drive System. One capstan extends from the motor shaft itself, eliminating intervening gears that can hamper speed accuracy. The other tape drive capstan connects through an extremely steady belt-drive inertia wheel. For a "mirror image" of the original signal, Sony's exclusive Phase Compensator Circuit comes closest achieving this by rectifying phase distortion and producing sound qualitty virtually identical to the original source.

​Illuminated, calibrated and ultra-clear for best monitoring possible, Sony's Professional Studio Standard VU meters are identical in size, shape, color and sensitivity to those on professional consoles. Because of Sony's outstanding Ferrite & Ferrite Heads, plus the remarkably precise fabrication and alignment of the head gap, recordings retain exact positioning of signal throughout the stereo field. The "location" of individual sounds won't wander. There's no annoying phase shift. More professional features include direct-coupled playback FET amplifier, flashing Standby Signal, Punch-in Record and solenoid-operated Logic-Controlled Transport Functions to let you move instantly to and from any mode without stopping. Standard equipment: RM-30 full-function remote control unit with record mute and hinged head cover.



reel to reel

reel to reel

reel to reel

reel to reel

reel to reel

reel to reel

26 November 2018

SONY TC-R7-2 (1977) - To be heard to be believed

reel to reel

Sony's hi-fi components line has to be heard to be believed. With the lowest wow and flutter of any deck Sony ever built, a duo of tape recorders were introduced in 1977. These were the Japanese market SONY TC-R6 and SONY TC-R7-2. The same models were available worldwide as SONY TC-765 and SONY TC-766-2. They both share the same construction but while the R6 is a 4 Track Stereo Recorder running at 9.5 and 19 cm/s the R7-2 is a 2 Track Stereo Recorder running at 19 and 38 cm/s with an additional 4 Track head for playback. The SONY TC-R7-2 achieves an incredible wow and flutter of 0.018% (WRMS) at 38 cm/s and 0.04% (WRMS) at 19 cm/s. This is achieved via a Closed Loop Dual Capstan Tape Drive System. One capstan extends from the motor shaft itself, eliminating intervening gears that can hamper speed accuracy. The other tape drive capstan connects through an extremely steady belt-drive inertia wheel. For a "mirror image" of the original signal, Sony's exclusive Phase Compensator Circuit comes closest achieving this by rectifying phase distortion and producing sound qualitty virtually identical to the original source. 

Illuminated, calibrated and ultra-clear for best monitoring possible, Sony's Professional Studio Standard VU meters are identical in size, shape, color and sensitivity to those on professional consoles. Because of Sony's outstanding Ferrite & Ferrite Heads, plus the remarkably precise fabrication and alignment of the head gap, recordings retain exact positioning of signal throughout the stereo field. The "location" of individual sounds won't wander. There's no annoying phase shift. More professional features include direct-coupled playback FET amplifier, flashing Standby Signal, Punch-in Record and solenoid-operated Logic-Controlled Transport Functions to let you move instantly to and from any mode without stopping. Standard equipment: RM-30 full-function remote control unit with record mute and hinged head cover.

reel to reel

reel to reel

reel to reel

reel to reel

reel to reel

reel to reel

reel to reel

reel to reel

12 December 2017

15 Designer Racks - More Then Audio.

KODO by Joachim B. Stanitzek for BLAUPUNKT 1988
KODO by Joachim B. Stanitzek for BLAUPUNKT 1988

Normally when we say audio rack we think of a simple piece of furniture with shelves and wheels or a more "profesional" system holding components via front panel mounting screws. There were however some exceptions as well, with manufacturers asking artists or designers to come up with unique concepts for audio storage. Below you can see a selection of such concepts initiated by manufacturers like BLAUPUNKT or PHILIPS. 

BLAUPUNKT had collaborated with Joachim B. Stanitzek, Susanne Neubohn, Christian Schneider-Moll and furniture manufacturer interlübke. PHILIPS had collaborated with world famous designers like Ettore Sottsass (founder Memphis Group) or Andrée Putman.

In some cases there were in house creations as well like the ones from PHILIPS, SONY or by Jakob Jensen as Bang&Olufsen designer.

Joachim Stanitzek, Media Component Holder BG-1, 1988-1989
Joachim Stanitzek, Media Component Holder BG-1, 1988-1989

Vis-ä-Vis by Susanne Neubohn for BLAUPUNKT 1987
Vis-ä-Vis by Susanne Neubohn for BLAUPUNKT 1987

Baobab by Christian Scnaider-Moll for BLAUPUNKT 1988
Baobab by Christian Scnaider-Moll for BLAUPUNKT 1988

interlübke Caddy RO 63 for BLAUPUNKT 1988
interlübke Caddy RO 63 for BLAUPUNKT 1988

interlübke for BLAUPUNKT 1988
interlübke for BLAUPUNKT 1988

PHILIPS 1998
PHILIPS 1998

Ettore Sottsass PHILIPS Design Edtion No.2 1994
Ettore Sottsass PHILIPS Design Edtion No.2 1994

Mediathek Andrée Putman PHILIPS 1994
Mediathek by Andrée Putman PHILIPS 1994

PHILIPS R 900 for Series 900 components 1994
PHILIPS R 900 for Series 900 components 1994

sony 1998
SONY 1998

sony 1998
SONY 1998

Sony 1993
SONY 1993

ATTYCA 1 by Jakob Jensen  Bang&Olufsen 1986
ATTYCA 1 by Jakob Jensen  Bang&Olufsen 1986

Studio Metamorfosi office by Studio Alchimia  1984
Studio Metamorfosi office by Studio Alchimia  1984