Showing posts with label TOSHIBA. Show all posts
Showing posts with label TOSHIBA. Show all posts

24 January 2020

Aurex Micro System 15 (1978) - New Dimension in High Performance

Micro System 15


Toshiba's System 15 microcomponents were introduced in 1978. Aurex was Toshiba's brand name for the japanese market but these micro components were sold with both Toshiba or Aurex logo worldwide. With less than half the size of usual components they set new performance level, in the meantime being elegant in appearance. The components of the Micro System 15 are:

SC-M15 - power amplifier (DC) incorporating a large toroidal power transformer, 40 W/ch (20 to 20,000Hz, 8 ohms), THD: less than 0.02%, Frequency response: 0Hc (DC) to 70,000Hz, BTL use is possible
SY-C15 - preamplifier: Dual FET DC equalizer amp and DC tone amp, THD: less than 0.01%, Frequency response: 10Hz to 100,000Hz
ST-F15 - FM tuner: Digital frequency synthesizer with auto/manual tuning and 10 station presets, Synthesizer accuracy: 0.0025%
PC-D15 - two motor cassette deck with IC logic control, two heads, direct loading and Dual Capstan Drive, Wow & Flutter: less than 0.04%, Frequency response: 20Hz to 18,000Hz

All components are 257 mm wide with a one piece diecast aluminium chassis for the power amplifier while the other components feature one piece front and top panel with additional aluminum panel at the back (instead of steel) and sides. All components were available in silver or in a more rare black version. This basic setup could be expanded with the following components:

ST-S20 - FM, AM, LW and SW Digital Quartz Synthesizer tuner
AD-15 - adres adapter. Toshiba's own noise reduction system in a separate box as an alternative to the Dolby circuit of the cassette deck
AT-12 - programmable Digital Timer
RM-15 - wired remote (5 m) for the cassette deck
AR-15HU - mini rack
AR-15VU - large rack on casters that could accomodate a SR-F45 turntable
SS-S12 - mini loudspeakers
SS-930S - large loudspeakers


Micro System 15

Micro System 15

Micro System 15

Micro System 15

Micro System 15

Micro System 15

Micro System 15

Micro System 15

05 June 2018

TOSHIBA SA-7150 (1978) - World's First Digital Synthesizer Receiver.

World's First Digital Synthesizer Receiver.

You are looking at the world's first receiver with a digital Phased-lock Loop (PLL) frequency sythesizer for both FM and AM. The SA-7150 delivers tuning accuracy that approaches theoretical limits not possible with pointer and tuning meters. This is of enormous importance if music is important to you. Accurate tuning of the precise broadcast frequency means the lowest possible distortion, the greatest possible fidelity and the widest possible dynamic range. Toshiba had the resources and technical expertise to originate as well as manufacture the many ultra-sophisticated parts and circuits such as LSI's in the synthesizer section that assure the purity of the original signal. The SA-7150 is decidedly not your average receiver. But then, Toshiba isn't your average company.

Continuous Power Output:
150 W/channel (min. RMS at 8 ohm, 20-20,000 Hz , no more than 0,05% T.H.D.)
Dimensions (W x H x D):  550 x 200 x 500 mm
Weight:  27 kg


World's First Digital Synthesizer Receiver.

World's First Digital Synthesizer Receiver.

09 January 2018

19 Stereo Consoles - Made in Japan


In the early days of Home Stereo it was a custom that all the components were housed in a single unit having the shape and design of a piece of furniture. This trend started where High Fidelity was born, namely in America. Japanese manufacturers were quickly adapting to this trend and created a series of Console Stereo during the 60's. Here are some fine examples from well known manufacturers featuring both Stereo and Quadraphonic (early Surround) systems.


COLUMBIA DSC835 (1964)
COLUMBIA DSC835 (1964)

NATIONAL (1964)
NATIONAL (1964)

ONKYO MC-2200 (1968)
ONKYO MC-2200 (1968)

PIONEER PSC-1 (1960)
PIONEER PSC-1 (1960)

PIONEER PSC-5A (1961)
PIONEER PSC-5A (1961)

SANSUI APS-530 (1965)
SANSUI APS-530 (1965)

Technics SC-1600 (1969)
Technics SC-1600 (1969)

TOSHIBA MEISTERSINGER NO20 (1964)
TOSHIBA MEISTERSINGER NO20 (1964)

VICTOR STL-3 (1959)
VICTOR STL-3 (1959)

VICTOR STL-661 (1963)
VICTOR STL-661 (1963)

VICTOR STL-690M (1967)
VICTOR STL-690M (1967)

VICTOR STL-740MG (1966)
VICTOR STL-740MG (1966)

QUADRAPHONIC Consoles

SANSUI Q-2000 (1971)
SANSUI Q-2000 (1971)

VICTOR DF-11DX (1974)
VICTOR DF-11DX (1974)


05 December 2017

7 Cassette Decks....Then They Were Vertical

akai
AKAI on the wall - 1974

When we say Cassette deck we normally think of a square box of a component that can be stacked one on each other. This was not however always the case. In the 70's some manufacturers tried a different approach by promoting vertical standing models that can be wall mounted or simply standing next to a tape recorder - like the big boys. Here is a selection of vertical standing cassette decks by various manufacturers.


akai gxc-510d 1974
AKAI GXC-510D 1974

aurex pc-6030 1976
Aurex (TOSHIBA) PC-6030 1976

denon dr750 1977
DENON DR750 1977

nakamichi 700 1973
Nakamichi 700 1973

PHILIPS N2521 1977
PHILIPS N2521 1977

teac a-860 1976
TEAC A-860 1976

tandberg TCD 330 1977
TANDBERG TCD 330 (right) 1977

For More Cassette Deck click here.

19 January 2017

PCM Adapter - Old Digital Audio Format

Before the introduction of a standardized format to record digital audio to a tape (the DAT recorder) the practice was  to use a PCM adapter (pulse code modulation) connected to a video recorder to record the digital audio signal to tape. The PCM adapter was connected to a video recorder using the video in/out of the unit in order to record the PCM coded audio digital signal where normally the video signal is recorded. The reason to do this was that a linear tape recorder did not have sufficient bandwidth to record large volumes of PCM data while video recorders were available both for studio and home use and the rotary video heads used in a video recorder had sufficient bandwidth to do this. Most video-based PCM adaptors record audio at 14 bits quantization, and a sampling frequency of 44.056 kHz.

pcm adapter
PCM connection diagram

First generation PCM adapter

pcm adapter
SONY PCM-1 1977

pcm adapter
Technics SH-P1 1979

pcm adapter
DIATONE PCM

pcm adapter
SHARP RX-1 VC-6300 1979

Commercial models

pcm adapter
Aurex XD-80 1981

pcm adapter
Aurex XD-60 1981 (right)

pcm adapter
DIATONE D-102 1982

pcm adapter
SONY PCM-F1 1981

pcm adapter
Technics SV-100

pcm adapter
SONY PCM-501 1984 / 553ESD 1985 / 701ES 1984

pcm adapter
Sanyo PLUS 5

pcm adapter
Sansui PC-X1 / PC-X11 1988

Dedicated audio players using VHS video tape

pcm adapter
Technics SV-P100

pcm adapter
HITACHI PCM-V300 1982

VCR with PCM audio

pcm adapter
Aurex TOSHIBA PCM-D1

pcm adapter
Aurex TOSHIBA PCM-D1

Prerecorded PCM audio on VHS tape

pcm adapter
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab prerecorded PCM (digital) audio on VHS

More vintage audio @ www.1001hifi.com